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  • Newly Elected President - Steve Bristow & Outgoing President - Butch Bailey
  • 2016 Navy League Award Recipients
  • NAS Whidbey - 2016 CNIC Large Installation Excellence Award Winner
  • 2015 4th of July - Banner & Flag Wavers
  • 2015 4th of July - Jo Balda
  • 2015 4th of July - Sailor of the Year
  • 2015 4th of July - Marine of the Year
  • Thank You, VETERANS!
  • Veterans Day Speaker: Admiral McDaniel
  • Military Appreciation Picnic
  • Deception Pass Bridge - WELCOME TO WHIDBEY ISLAND
  • A-6 & EA6-B - WELCOME TO OAK HARBOR & NAS WHIDBEY
  • Welcome to Oak Harbor
  • Race Week
  • Deception Pass Bridge at Sunset

OAK HARBOR AREA COUNCIL
offers CONGRATULATIONS!
to NAS Whidbey
#1 Navy Installation

Not only is Naval Air Station Whidbey Island the best Navy base in the world
— it’s one of the top U.S. military bases too.


Friday 30 September 2016
On this date in . . .  
1960 Flintstones premiers (1st prime time animation show)
1960 On Howdy Doody's last show Clarabelle finally talks "Goodbye Kids"

Dates in American Military History:  30  September
from the website: thisdayinusmilhist.wordpress.com/about/

1777 – The Congress of the United States, forced to flee in the face of advancing British forces, moved to York, Pennsylvania.
1800 – U.S. concludes treaty of peace with France, ending Quasi War with France.
1857Unable to obtain trading privileges in Vietnam through diplomacy, the French begin their campaign to take Vietnam. They attack Danang and take the city in early 1958. This fails to foment the uprising of oppressed Christians that they had expected. Decimated by disease, they push south to take Saigon by 1861. Vietnam is divided by a strong popular rebellion in the north, and under the weak Emperor Tu Duc, regional risings against the French are never coordinated successfully. Hanoi falls in 1883.
1899 – First Navy wireless message sent via Lighthouse Service Station at Highlands of Navesink, New Jersey.
1924 – Allies stopped checking on the German navy.
1932 – “Chesty” Puller won second Navy Cross.
1939 – Germany and Russia agreed to partition Poland.
1943 – The Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps became the Women’s Army Corps, a regular contingent of the U.S. Army with the same status as other army service corps.
1943 – The US 5th Army continues to advance. Elements of the British 10th Corps reach the outskirts of Naples as elements of US 6th Corps capture Avellino.
1944 Admiral Fort takes command of US operations in this island group. He announces that Peleliu, Angaur, Ngesebus and Kongauru have been completely occupied. Japanese resistance continues, however.
1944 – Calais was reoccupied by Allies.
1944 – USS Nautilus (SS-168) lands supplies and evacuates some people from Panay, Philipppine Islands.
1945 – American Marines of the US 3rd Amphibious Corps start landing at Tientsin, in the north, to disarm 630,000 Japanese.
1946 – U.S. Government announces that U.S. Navy units would be permanently stationed in the Mediterranean to carry out American policy and diplomacy.
1949 After 15 months and more than 250,000 flights, the Berlin Airlift officially comes to an end. The airlift was one of the greatest logistical feats in modern history and was one of the crucial events of the early Cold War. In June 1948, the Soviet Union suddenly blocked all ground traffic into West Berlin, which was located entirely within the Russian zone of occupation in Germany. It was an obvious effort to force the United States, Great Britain, and France (the other occupying powers in Germany) to accept Soviet demands concerning the postwar fate of Germany. As a result of the Soviet blockade, the people of West Berlin were left without food, clothing, or medical supplies. Some U.S. officials pushed for an aggressive response to the Soviet provocation, but cooler heads prevailed and a plan for an airlift of supplies to West Berlin was developed. It was a daunting task: supplying the daily wants and needs of so many civilians would require tons of food and other goods each and every day. On June 26, 1948, the Berlin Airlift began with U.S. pilots and planes carrying the lion’s share of the burden. During the next 15 months, 277,264 aircraft landed in West Berlin bringing over 2 million tons of supplies. On September 30, 1949, the last plane–an American C-54–landed in Berlin and unloaded over two tons of coal. Even though the Soviet blockade officially ended in May 1949, it took several more months for the West Berlin economy to recover and the necessary stockpiles of food, medicine, and fuel to be replenished. The Berlin Airlift was a tremendous Cold War victory for the United States. Without firing a shot, the Americans foiled the Soviet plan to hold West Berlin hostage, while simultaneously demonstrating to the world the “Yankee ingenuity” for which their nation was famous. For the Soviets, the Berlin crisis was an unmitigated disaster. The United States, France, and Great Britain merely hardened their resolve on issues related to Germany, and the world came to see the Russians as international bullies, trying to starve innocent citizens.
1949 – The rank of commodore, established in 1943 as a wartime measure, was terminated by the President under the provisions of an Act of Congress approved 24 July 1941.
1950 – U.N. forces crossed the 38th parallel separating North and South Korea as they pursued the retreating North Korean Army.
1953 – Eisenhower approves $385,000,000 over he $400,000,000 already budgeted for military aid for Vietnam. by April 1954 aid to Indochina reaches $1,133,000,000 out of a total foreign aid budget of $3,497,000,000.
1954 The USS Nautilus, the world’s first nuclear submarine, is commissioned by the U.S. Navy. The Nautilus was constructed under the direction of U.S. Navy Captain Hyman G. Rickover, a brilliant Russian-born engineer who joined the U.S. atomic program in 1946. In 1947, he was put in charge of the navy’s nuclear-propulsion program and began work on an atomic submarine. Regarded as a fanatic by his detractors, Rickover succeeded in developing and delivering the world’s first nuclear submarine years ahead of schedule. In 1952, the Nautilus’ keel was laid by President Harry S. Truman, and on January 21, 1954, first lady Mamie Eisenhower broke a bottle of champagne across its bow as it was launched into the Thames River at Groton, Connecticut. Commissioned on September 30, 1954, it first ran under nuclear power on the morning of January 17, 1955. Much larger than the diesel-electric submarines that preceded it, the Nautilus stretched 319 feet and displaced 3,180 tons. It could remain submerged for almost unlimited periods because its atomic engine needed no air and only a very small quantity of nuclear fuel. The uranium-powered nuclear reactor produced steam that drove propulsion turbines, allowing the Nautilus to travel underwater at speeds in excess of 20 knots. In its early years of service, the USS Nautilus broke numerous submarine travel records and in August 1958 accomplished the first voyage under the geographic North Pole. After a career spanning 25 years and almost 500,000 miles steamed, the Nautilus was decommissioned on March 3, 1980. Designated a National Historic Landmark in 1982, the world’s first nuclear submarine went on exhibit in 1986 as the Historic Ship Nautilus at the Submarine Force Museum in Groton, Connecticut.
1954 – NATO nations agreed to arm and admit West Germany.
1958 – Marines leave Lebanon.
1959 – Last flight of airshps assigned to the Naval Air Reserve at Lakehurst, NJ takes place.
1961 – A bill for the 1773 Boston Tea Party was paid by Mayor Snyder of Oregon. He wrote a check for $196, the total cost of all tea lost.

Contact Us  
Oak Harbor Navy League
P.O. Box 847
Oak Harbor, Washington 98277
Phone 360.720.8398
Mobile 360-929-3928
Regular Schedule  
Tuesday
  • 1st Tue. Monthly Mtgs @ CPO Club [Sep.-June]
    11:30 AM to 1:00 PM
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MEETINGS @ CPO Club

No meetings in July and August

Tuesday
4 October 2016
11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
regular meeting

Tuesday
1 November 2016
11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
regular meeting

UPCOMING EVENTS

  Veteran's Day
Program

11 th Month
11 th Day
11:00

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